New version of Maventy Android app

Screenshot_2016-03-08-12-41-38 Screenshot_2016-03-12-19-36-48 Screenshot_2016-03-08-12-41-49

Recently we have released the new version of the Maventy Android app available at Google Play

More information

childhealth.maventy.org is a free application to track child malnutrition online. We offer data storage, a history view, reports, nutrition recommendations and search through secured access from anywhere (including mobile phones).

Our software provides z-scores and percentiles for basic anthropometric measures such as weight, height, head circumference and weight for height, based on a child’s vital statistics. The results are calibrated against World Health Organization (WHO) standards (link).

We also have a mobile application that volunteers can use offline in remote villages. This tool uploads data to the main database whenever the connection to the internet is available.

Maventy’s mission is to save lives, and improve health and quality of life through the most modern ways of prevention and early intervention. See maventy.org.

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Reverse innovation in mHealth. Innovating in emerging countries to impact in the global market.

Recently, doctors in Austria implanted into a patient the first pacemaker which does not require surgery. Medtronic says it is the smallest pacemaker in the world. The device is 24 millimeters long and 0.75 cubic centimeters in volume—a tenth the size of a conventional pacemaker. Earlier this year, another device manufacturer, St. Jude Medical, bought a startup called Nanostim that makes another tiny pacemaker, and St. Jude is offering it to patients in Europe. This device is 41 millimeters long and one cubic centimeter in volume. The main advantage of the reduced dimesions of this pacemaker is that doctors can implant it into the heart through blood vessels, via an incision in the thigh. They use steerable, flexible tubes called catheters to push the pacemakers through a large vein.

Moreover the novel features of this pacemaker extend beyond its innovative implantation. The mini-pacemaker’s telemetry might facilitate a development in the future that would allow healthcare professionals to control the device and monitor patients using a standard programmer via smartphones, thereby providing individual treatment to patients in the most rural of areas. –

Why did Medtronic start working on this?. This post at the Harvard Business Review addresses the topic very well. It explains how Medtronic started working on this tiny pacemaker to fit the requirements of emerging markets such as India. Eventually, they come up with an innovative product for the global market.

Sixty-nine percent of deaths in the developing world are due to chronic disease, yet only 2.3% of international aid is allocated to chronic disease. In the United States, hospitalization of chronic disease patients accounts for the majority of health care costs. But innovation in managing chronic disease is happening faster in emerging markets such as India as a result of the scarcity of physicians.

At this point, few specialists are actually trained to monitor this device, or other Medtronic devices. In addition, the fragmentation of India’s healthcare system means that clinical outcomes aren’t monitored and evaluated in a standardized way. This increases the potential for device failure, and personal-injury lawsuits — a serious concern for Medtronic in a market with millions of customers. Medtronic recently paid $268 million to settle cases stemming from fracture-prone cables used to connect hearts to defibrillators, which earlier recalls could have avoided.

But Medtronic anticipated these institutional voids in the healthcare regulatory system. To preempt poor clinical-outcome monitoring, Medtronic placed passive remote sensors in the stent and pacemaker that transmit signals via any mobile handset to a cloud computing infrastructure — “patient care in the cloud.” The technology is being adapted for remote monitoring and adjustment of other products, including neuromodulators for Parkinson’s patients, and glucose modules.

At this point, few specialists are actually trained to monitor this device, or other Medtronic devices. In addition, the fragmentation of India’s healthcare system means that clinical outcomes aren’t monitored and evaluated in a standardized way. This increases the potential for device failure, and personal-injury lawsuits — a serious concern for Medtronic in a market with millions of customers. Medtronic recently paid $268 million to settle cases stemming from fracture-prone cables used to connect hearts to defibrillators, which earlier recalls could have avoided.

Actually, this process is known from some time ago as reverse innovation :

The process of reverse innovation begins by focusing on needs and requirements for low-cost products in countries like India and China. Once products are developed for these markets, they are then sold elsewhere – even in the West – at low prices which creates new markets and uses for these innovations.

We can see it as another consequence of globalization, medical device innovators have been embracing the notion of making products simpler, stripping out costs to make devices affordable for those who have very little income, and adapting devices to make them invaluable for healthcare professionals who don’t have the state-of-the-art facilities of a Western hospital. For sure, we will continue to see this process in the coming years.

Stephen Oesterle, Medtronic’s Vice President for Medicine and Technology, announced the development of the mini-pacemaker at the 2010 TEDMED

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Tweets&Links [Aug. 2012]

PhD Comics 082112

Via (www.phdcomics.com)

m-Kifafa: mHealth initiative to fight epilepsy in Kenya http://goo.gl/WCSEg via @texttochange @SafaricomLtd @AMREF_Worldwide

Oops! Copyright Cops Return Seized RojaDirecta Domain Names – 19 Months Later | Threat Level | http://Wired.com http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2012/08/domain-names-returned/ …

Coming Next: Using an App as Prescribed http://nyti.ms/NVo3vj

This article is pretty neat! How augmented reality will change the way we live via @Intel #iQ http://intel.ly/PRsHKK

Mobile money would transform even more lives in poor countries if regulators got out of the way http://econ.st/R3ZPvK

Big data y el futuro de la medicina (2) http://feedly.com/k/QMUFHy

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Tweets&Links [June2012]

#Euro2012 Twitter

A summary for the action on Twitter during the European football tournament. (Via Twitter)

Quién domina Internet en las diversas zonas del mundo (Internet) @microsiervos microsiervos.com

Facebook is eating the world, except for China and Russia: World map of social networks http://tnw.to/c06V via @tnwsocialmedia

¿Sobran investigadores en España? amazings.es via @Amazings_es

Data Never Sleeps ritholtz.com

RT @PwCHealth #Mhealth is not just technology driven hype, read what doctors, patients and health insurers have to say, pwc.com

Reflexiones sobre el sistema universitario español: javiersegovia22.blogspot.com.es

The health spending map of the world http://gu.com/p/38yb5/tw via @guardian

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Tweets&Links del mes [Junio]

Daniel Kraft: Medicine’s future? There’s an app for that http://t.co/eyHedAs

University of Sydney Utilizing Virtual Reality and MRI to Study Parkinson’s http://t.co/bsU12ry

iCard ECG Turns Any iPhone/iPad Into a Powerful Electrocardiograph http://t.co/abgXASy via @Medgadget
Smartheart Lightweight Personal 12-Lead ECG Announced http://t.co/sKVnW9L (via: @Medgadget)

Headmouse: ratón virtual para discapacitados http://t.co/1lmzefK via @FayerWayer

eBay compra la plataforma de código abierto Magento http://t.co/KPwwSIz via @elmundoes

Parece que el nuevo Windows 8 es html5 y javascript..encantador excepto para los desarrolladores de windows http://t.co/7ls1MqH via @jsalvachua

“El capital riesgo en España… ni es capital, ni es riesgo” | @cotizalia @BernieHernie http://j.mp/mr77vx ← Alto y claro..

Post. 10 medidas para que en España haya mas Startups http://bit.ly/mMzGSR via @JesusEncinar
Even though larger firms have the potential to innovate, it is often the smaller ones that make more advances http://econ.st/k1yC6M via (@TheEconomist)

Brillante infografía sobre #YouTube: Cada minuto se suben 48 horas de vídeo http://bit.ly/l1lfjJ via @internetng

Comparativa de iTunes Match con Amazon Cloud Player, Google Music y Spotify http://t.co/GEor8R7 via @applesfera
Apple’s new iCloud is bound to prompt a response from rivals like Google and Amazon http://econ.st/lKnyxK via @TheEconomist

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